Tag Archives: Caribbean


Duolingo Beta put to the test: can you learn a language while translating the web?

Posted on by Tommaso De Benetti

… skills, recently put to the test – with mediocre results – while exploring a notorious Caribbean island.)

A brilliant user interface

At first glance, Duolingo is clean, friendly and sleek. There is no hint of the annoying and unintentionally funny user interface associated with reCAPTCHA.

To begin with, the platform gave me a quick tour, introducing really basic concepts and allowing me to try my hand at translating simple sentences. At any time I could hover on each …

Tags: Caribbean crowd crowdsourcing Duolingo Google Books Luis von Ahn microtask microwork new york times reCAPTCHA TED translation

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7 degrees of failure: Is the power of the crowd overrated?

Posted on by Tommaso De Benetti

… In 2012! This is no excuse, by the way, Johnny Depp. Please do not make any more Pirates of the Caribbean movies.)

Of course, if you’re into global hide and seek challenges, the TAG Challenge is not the only game in town (“phew!” I hear you say). There is also Geocaching, in which participants try to find hidden items using teamwork, GPS and mobile phones. But, like crowdsourcing, this game works a lot better when the object of your search leaves itself open to being found. If I …

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The land that time forgot: How crowdsourcing can help bring Cuba into the 21st Century

Posted on by Tommaso De Benetti

With its beautiful crumbling buildings and vintage motor cars, spicy culture and rich history, few countries excite the imagination like Cuba.

Over the Christmas break I visited this tiny island that occupies such a large place in world culture and history. Explaining the country of Castro is probably impossible, but triumphant Socialism or the white sandy beaches of …

Tags: Brazil Caribbean crowd crowdsourcing Cuba Cuban Fidel Castro Havana microwork United States Varadero

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Twitter Predictions: the future is just 140 characters away

Posted on by Ville Miettinen

… his Twitter-prediction method to a London hedge fund (and so will presumably be retiring to a Caribbean island very soon).

Meaning overload

So far, Twitter experimenters have relied on relatively simple language-processing software to extract data from tweets. To get deeper insights, you need to do deeper analysis. The trouble is that human language is notoriously difficult for machines to interpret. Give humans 140 characters and we insist on making jokes, using sarcasm, and loading …

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