Tag Archives: Magic the Gathering


What Wizard Battles Can Teach Us About Crowdsourcing

Posted on by Seth W

… about crowdsourcing, I’m busy being a huge geek. Not trendy geek chic, unfortunately, but the old fashioned type (a trendsetter maybe?). Read on bearing this in mind.

My main vice is Magic: the Gathering, a role-play card game where players are magically-dueling wizards. The only game pieces are cards which represent classical magic spells like fire blasts and enchantments. Like I said, I’m a geek.

What does this have to do with crowdsourcing? Well, about 10 years ago, the

Tags: Card game crowdsourcing games Geek iPad Magic Magic the Gathering microtask Trading Card Games

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Every murder draws a crowd: Homicide Watch DC

Posted on by Ville Miettinen

“Homicide Watch DC” sounds like a cop drama, and to be honest it’s got the makings of a police procedural (especially for those of us familiar with the 5th season of The Wire ). Instead Homicide Watch is a crowdfunded, crowdsourced reporting project, covering every homicide in the District of Colombia.

This claim is so bold as to almost be suspect. More than a hundred people are murdered in the US capital every year. That’s a huge number of stories, …

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Summer Blockbuster, in cinemas now: The Document Processing Knight Rises

Posted on by Tommaso De Benetti

… than discussing strange and new types of crowdsourcing. From weird music-related experiments to the incidence of expressions such as “I need to” during the Mad Men era, we try to keep you informed with what is going on across our industry.

Every now and then, however, we use this forum to talk about something much closer to our home and hearts: ourselves.

For the last few years Microtask has focused its efforts on solving the traditional problems associated with document …

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Cracking the code: The crowd vs the virus

Posted on by Ville Miettinen

… Today’s blog involves a thrilling tale of international espionage. But for once the hero is not an alcoholic, sex-addicted Englishman with a fancy exploding pen. This time it’s a rather remarkable crowd.

So before you read further, please ensure that your Cone of Silence has been activated, and that nobody has cut any eye holes in any of your paintings. All done? Good, then I can begin.

The story begins in 2010, when Iranian state computers were brought to a …

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Kony 2012: the crowd to the rescue?

Posted on by Ville Miettinen

Unless you’re a solitary hermit with no Facebook friends, you’ll have seen the Kony 2012 film, which racked up an astonishing 70m hits in its first week. You may also have heard the criticisms of Invisible Children, the charity behind the film, and read the charity’s response to its critics.

Leaving aside these issues, the nature of the campaign and its enormous viral success are clearly very interesting from a crowdsourcing perspective. Obviously the

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